Mentally ill 'hit hard by recession'

madvocate:

The economic recession across Europe has had a profound impact on people with mental health problems, research from King’s College London suggests. Between 2006 and 2010, the rate of unemployment for those with mental health problems rose twice as much as for other people - from 12.7% to 18.2%. Men and those with low levels of education were particularly affected, the study said. The authors warn that social exclusion could increase among the mentally ill.

Scientists collected data from 20,000 people across 27 EU countries using the Eurobarometer survey, which looked at mental health, attitudes to those with mental health problems and current employment rate. For those without mental health problems, the unemployment rate increased from 7.1% in 2006 to 9.8% in 2010 - half the increase compared with the previous group. In addition, the study identified that men with mental health problems were particularly vulnerable. The unemployment rate for this group increased from 13.7% in 2006 to 21.7% in 2010.

Stigma

The researchers, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, found that negative attitudes to people with mental health problems were a factor in the rise in unemployment. The study said: “Living in a country where a higher proportion of individuals believe that individuals with mental illness are dangerous was associated with a higher likelihood of unemployment for people with mental health problems, but did not influence employment rates for those without mental health problems.” It is thought that unemployed people with mental health problems may also be less likely to seek help and and may need specific outreach support.

Dr Sara Evans-Lacko, lead study author and lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, said the study did not have unemployment rates for individual EU countries. She suggested the trend was a general one across Europe which was not specific to any one culture. ”During a recession people who already have mental health problems find their economic and social position gets worse. We don’t exactly know why, but it’s harder for people to get a job if there’s already a gap on their CV and if employers need to cut staff then these people might be more vulnerable.” The danger is that economic hardship can intensify the social exclusion of vulnerable people, such as those with mental health problems, the study said.

‘Legal duty’

Prof Graham Thornicroft, also from the research team at the Institute of Psychiatry, said there were steps which could be taken to prevent this happening. ”Governments need to be aware of these risks, and employers need to be aware of their legal duty to comply with the Equality Act to support people with mental health problems coming into, and staying in, employment,” he said.

Beth Murphy, head of information at mental health charity Mind, said the findings were worrying. ”Mental well-being depends on many factors, including employment status, working conditions and financial security, all of which can be affected during a recession. Since 2008, the Mind Infoline has received an increasing number of enquiries from people concerned about the impact of money and unemployment on their mental health, which could well be attributed to the economic downturn. Specifically, redundancy is known to trigger depression and suicidal thoughts, as is the case with debt.” She added: “Losing your job is a sudden change and there can also be financial implications through loss of income, which in itself can cause anxiety. We’d urge anybody struggling with their mental health to seek support.”

(Source: pathologisingsadness)

Neuroscience: Compound enhances SSRI antidepressant's effects in mice

neurosciencestuff:

A synthetic compound is able to turn off “secondary” vacuum cleaners in the brain that take up serotonin, resulting in the “happy” chemical being more plentiful, scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio have discovered. Their study,…

(Source: eurekalert.org)

neurosciencestuff:

Alzheimer’s disease protein controls movement in mice
Researchers in Berlin and Munich, Germany and Oxford, United Kingdom, have revealed that a protein well known for its role in Alzheimer’s disease controls spindle development in muscle and leads to impaired movement in mice when the protein is absent or treated with inhibitors. The results, which are published in The EMBO Journal, suggest that drugs under development to target the beta-secretase-1 protein, which may be potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, might produce unwanted side effects related to defective movement.
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia found in older adults. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 18 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease. The number of people affected by the disease may increase to 34 million by 2025. Scientists know that the protein beta-secretase-1 or Bace1, a protease enzyme that breaks down proteins into smaller molecules, is involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Bace1 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein and generates the damaging Abeta peptides that accumulate as plaques in the brain leading to disease. Now scientists have revealed in more detail how Bace1 works.
“Our results show that mice that lack Bace1 proteins or are treated with inhibitors of the enzyme have difficulties in coordination and walking and also show reduced muscle strength,” remarked Carmen Birchmeier, one of the authors of the paper, Professor at the Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany, and an EMBO Member. “In addition, we were able to show that the combined activities of Bace1 and another protein, neuregulin-1 or Nrg1, are needed to sustain the muscle spindles in mice and to maintain motor coordination.”
Muscle spindles are sensory organs that are found throughout the muscles of vertebrates. They are able to detect how muscles stretch and convey the perception of body position to the brain. The researchers used genetic analyses, biochemical studies and interference with pharmacological inhibitors to investigate how Bace1 works in mice. “If the signal strength of a specific form of neuregulin-1 known as IgNrg1 is gradually reduced, increasingly severe defects in the formation and maturation of muscle spindles are observed in mice. Furthermore, it appears that Bace1 is required for full IgNrg1 activity. The graded loss of IgNrg1 activity results in the animals having increasing difficulties with movement and coordination,” says Cyril Cheret, the first author of the work.
Drug developers are interested in stopping the Bace1 protein in its tracks because it represents a promising route to treat Alzheimer’s disease. If the protein were inhibited, it would interfere with the generation of the smaller damaging proteins that accumulate in the brain as amyloid plaques and would therefore provide some level of protection from the effects of the disease. “Our data indicate that one unwanted side effect of the long-term inhibition of Bace1 might be the disruption of muscle spindle formation and impairment of movement. This finding is relevant to scientists looking for ways to develop drugs that target the Bace1 protein and should be considered,” says Birchmeier. Several Bace1 inhibitors are currently being tested in phase II and phase III clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

neurosciencestuff:

Alzheimer’s disease protein controls movement in mice

Researchers in Berlin and Munich, Germany and Oxford, United Kingdom, have revealed that a protein well known for its role in Alzheimer’s disease controls spindle development in muscle and leads to impaired movement in mice when the protein is absent or treated with inhibitors. The results, which are published in The EMBO Journal, suggest that drugs under development to target the beta-secretase-1 protein, which may be potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, might produce unwanted side effects related to defective movement.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia found in older adults. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 18 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease. The number of people affected by the disease may increase to 34 million by 2025. Scientists know that the protein beta-secretase-1 or Bace1, a protease enzyme that breaks down proteins into smaller molecules, is involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Bace1 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein and generates the damaging Abeta peptides that accumulate as plaques in the brain leading to disease. Now scientists have revealed in more detail how Bace1 works.

“Our results show that mice that lack Bace1 proteins or are treated with inhibitors of the enzyme have difficulties in coordination and walking and also show reduced muscle strength,” remarked Carmen Birchmeier, one of the authors of the paper, Professor at the Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany, and an EMBO Member. “In addition, we were able to show that the combined activities of Bace1 and another protein, neuregulin-1 or Nrg1, are needed to sustain the muscle spindles in mice and to maintain motor coordination.”

Muscle spindles are sensory organs that are found throughout the muscles of vertebrates. They are able to detect how muscles stretch and convey the perception of body position to the brain. The researchers used genetic analyses, biochemical studies and interference with pharmacological inhibitors to investigate how Bace1 works in mice. “If the signal strength of a specific form of neuregulin-1 known as IgNrg1 is gradually reduced, increasingly severe defects in the formation and maturation of muscle spindles are observed in mice. Furthermore, it appears that Bace1 is required for full IgNrg1 activity. The graded loss of IgNrg1 activity results in the animals having increasing difficulties with movement and coordination,” says Cyril Cheret, the first author of the work.

Drug developers are interested in stopping the Bace1 protein in its tracks because it represents a promising route to treat Alzheimer’s disease. If the protein were inhibited, it would interfere with the generation of the smaller damaging proteins that accumulate in the brain as amyloid plaques and would therefore provide some level of protection from the effects of the disease. “Our data indicate that one unwanted side effect of the long-term inhibition of Bace1 might be the disruption of muscle spindle formation and impairment of movement. This finding is relevant to scientists looking for ways to develop drugs that target the Bace1 protein and should be considered,” says Birchmeier. Several Bace1 inhibitors are currently being tested in phase II and phase III clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

survivorschat:


Open Scheduled Chat
Topic: Male abusers
When: Mon, Wed, Fri July 1, 3, 5 2013 9PM ET + 1AM ET
Where: Chat Room 2
www.survivorschat.com/chat

survivorschat:

Open Scheduled Chat

Topic: Male abusers

When: Mon, Wed, Fri July 1, 3, 5 2013 9PM ET + 1AM ET

Where: Chat Room 2

www.survivorschat.com/chat

How Exercise Can Calm Anxiety

Bedsider: Depression and SEX

Neuroscience: 1 in 4 Stroke Patients Suffer PTSD

neurosciencestuff:

One in four people who survive a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the first year post-event, and one in nine experience chronic PTSD more than a year later. The data suggest that each year nearly 300,000 stroke/TIA…

(Source: newsroom.cumc.columbia.edu)

thetrevorproject:

stopbullying:

When kids have at least one friend they can trust and go to for support, they’re less likely to experience the long-term effects of bullying. Share these tips for befriending kids who are bullied.


Great tips from Stopbullying.gov! Bystanders can also share the Trevor Lifeline with anyone they think may be at risk: 1.866.488.7386

thetrevorproject:

stopbullying:

When kids have at least one friend they can trust and go to for support, they’re less likely to experience the long-term effects of bullying. Share these tips for befriending kids who are bullied.

Great tips from Stopbullying.gov! Bystanders can also share the Trevor Lifeline with anyone they think may be at risk: 1.866.488.7386

Stop Stigma Sacramento

The Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think project was initiated by Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services’ Division of Behavioral Health Services.

(Source: amyleona, via )

Neuroscience: Stress Hormone Could Trigger Mechanism for the Onset of Alzheimer’s

neurosciencestuff:

A chemical hormone released in the body as a reaction to stress could be a key trigger of the mechanism for the late onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study by researchers at Temple University.

Previous studies have shown that the chemical hormone corticosteroid, which is released into…

(Source: newswise.com)

survivorschat:

chloerayne:

TRIGGER WARNING

This is a Scottish anti-rape PSA that is a direct response to blaming a rape victim for dressing like a slut. What do you think? Is it effective?

Never have I seen such an effective video in my life… and it’s only 30 seconds long. Definitely, 100% watch and reblog this.

Watch all the way through before judging

(Source: slutshamersonfb)

surviving suicide together